Eight Great Exercises For Seniors



Let’s face it; everyone needs exercise, including seniors. Some might think that seniors aren’t able to do what younger generations are able to but this just isn’t true. Below is a list of eight types of exercises that people of all ages can enjoy.


Yoga

Adopt the right yoga exercise

Yoga

Yoga can be both a stress reliever and a workout. It is great for developing, or increasing, your core’s power, strengthening and lengthening your muscles, and adds a moderate level of cardio activity to your day. Another great thing about yoga is that it can help relieve any aches and pains you may have, especially back pain, that we are more likely to get with aging.

Pilates

Exercise regularly with pilates

Pilates

The center of all strength training routines is a promise to your core muscles because those, and the back muscles, support your body and is a more stable base for training the entire body. You might be surprised that Pilates can work out your stomach in ways that crunches can’t. Making an effort to maintain your core can pay off as we age. The muscles that reinforce your lower backs health and urinary continence are also strengthened with Pilates.

Tai Chi

Pratice Tai Chi daily helps reduce aches

Tai Chi for the elderly

The philosophy and history behind Tai Chi is deeper than we can get into right now but it combines meditation with the physical duo of balance and coordination. Not only can Tai Chi help with stress management but through low impact, slow motions that flow from a strong center, you can build strength.

 

Hiking/Walking

A period of low to moderate cardio, such as hiking and walking on a regular basis, is recommended by both experts and physicians alike for overall fitness. Whether its speed walking or slowing down the pace and enjoying the scenery on a hiking trail, cardio will keep you young at heart.

Power  Lifting

Don’t think that this one is just for the younger. Given that you are doing the same routine,

Lifting exercise is good for your spine

Power lifting

there is no reason why a 60 year old can’t be just as strong as someone who is younger than them. Preserving and building your muscle mass when you are older has been shown that it is linked to your crucial organs longevity and reserve. It is important to be mindful of your form and take a break if you need to. Also keep in mind that people of all ages can be passionate about working out and you don’t have to have the muscles of a body builder to feel stronger and appreciate yourself.

Swimming

Great exercise for the elderly

Swimming

There’s a good reason why swimming is known as the best full body workout. It works out your legs, arms, and glutes, and kicks your core muscles into gear more than any other kind of workout. The great thing about swimming is that it is a low impact workout and an option for people who have joint or chronic back problems.

 

Play

Lastly, do something you enjoy. You can start a new hobby or even just pick up an old one.

Practicing golf is good for your health

Golf

These can include golfing, skiing, dancing, ice skating, and rock climbing. Exercise can obviously test our will and motivation but that doesn’t mean it has to be boring. It should be about enjoying your life instead of trying to maintain it. The social reward, the emotional sensations, and mental challenge we get from exercise make us not only healthier, but happier.

 

If you have joint pain, you will want to keep repetitive activities and high impact sports, like tennis, to a minimum. Exercise is extremely rewarding so enjoy it!

Alyx Braze is a freelance writer who specializes in San Diego nursing homes and has a passion for helping the elderly.

This entry was posted in Lower Back Pain Exercises and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>